Family of Deceased Fights $1.5M bequest to the SPCA

A woman in Vancouver is contesting a bequest made in her great-aunt’s will in favor of the SPCA. A recent CBC story on the lawsuit can be found here: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/vancouver-family-heading-to-court-in-1-5m-inheritance-fight-with-spca-1.5803925

The deceased left the residue of her estate to the SPCA. The estate includes a valuable home in the Point Grey neighborhood of Vancouver. As a result of skyrocketing property values, it is estimated that the SPCA stands to receive approximately $1.5M from the estate.

The plaintiff is not the spouse or child of the deceased, so she does not have standing to vary the will. Instead, she wants to have a handwritten note composed by the deceased on her 99th birthday (in 2017) admitted to probate as reflecting the true final testamentary intentions of the deceased. The note purports to limit the amount of any gift to the SPCA to $100,000.

Section 58 of the Wills, Estates and Succession Act [“WESA”] allows the court to admit to probate a document or record that does not meet the technical requirements of a will. I have discussed this section in other posts, including one found here. This section would permit a handwritten note to be fully effective as though it had been made as part of the will.

In this case, the handwritten note is unsigned, undated and unwitnessed, and the deceased did not take any steps in the three years after writing the note to change her will to make it consistent with the note, so it will be interesting to see if it meets the test under s. 58 of WESA. The SPCA has also raised concerns about the deceased’s testamentary capacity when the note was written. If she had lacked capacity at the time, the handwritten note would not be effective as a testamentary instrument.

The plaintiff says that the SPCA is “greedy” for attempting to enforce the terms of the will, while the SPCA has called this a “challenging situation” for all parties.  The trial is set for January 2021.  However, as most estate litigation claims are settled in advance of trial through mediation and negotiation to avoid the expense and uncertainty of proceeding to trial, we may never know the final result.